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FAQ'S

Fur - Hot topics

  1. What do you mean by your claim that “fur is green”?
  2. How can the use of animals to make luxury products ever be ethical?
  3. How can I be sure the Canadian fur industry respects humane standards?
  4. Are those videos being circulated on the internet real?
  5. Are coats sold in Canada made from cat and dog fur?
  6. Who are the “animal activists” and what do they want?

1. What do you mean by your claim that “fur is green”?

The claim that “fur is green” is our current marketing ruse to convince the concerned consumer they are buying a product that is natural, renewable and sustainable, which they aren’t. To “be green” means to have positive environmental attributes or objectives, and if you were to explore our website in detail you would understand that there is nothing green about the fur industry.

This misleading campaign of ours is a form of greenwashing: spin in which green marketing or PR is deceptively used to promote the perception that an organisation’s aims and policies are environmentally friendly. In a bid to reverse the drop in demand for fur products, as well as the resulting fall in revenue, we are using greenwashing to manipulate popular opinion to support that which would otherwise be seen as dubious. You caught us out!

There is nothing natural, renewable or sustainable about fur; it is not an ecologically or environmentally sound product; and if someone cared for nature they would not purchase a product which is contributing directly to its destruction. We don’t want anyone to act so “irrationally” however, hence this marketing campaign!

2. How can the use of animals to make luxury products ever be ethical?

Well, this is awkward… It isn’t too hard for anyone to look up the definition of being ethical, so we’ll have to come clean. A moral philosophy which recommends (and defends) concepts of right and wrong, “ethics” specifically refers to a set of principles that guide us in determining what behaviour harms or helps sentient creatures.

The worldwide trade in luxury fur products is a multi-million dollar industry for us here in Canada. It might be an industry built on the systematic abuse and slaughter of fur-bearing animals, but we sure do make a lot of money from it! It is for this reason that those of us who work within the industry are more than happy to be part of this death trade, knowingly harming sentient creatures.

The principal concept of ethics is to maximise pleasure and minimise pain, from which we can deduce that to harm a sentient creature by willingly inflicting pain and suffering is undeniably wrong. In short, the use of animals for any means is unethical, and the fur industry is one of the most barbaric and unethical examples… It would be a lie (and we’ve already told too many of those) to say it doesn’t matter to us what other people think, as the general population is becoming a lot more environmentally and ethically conscious. This is one of many reasons why we engage in spin marketing to divert attention from the brutal truth.

3. How can I be sure the Canadian fur industry respects humane standards?

Those of us who are involved in the fur industry state we are “deeply committed to the humane treatment of animals” but as we demonstrate throughout the “animal welfare” section of the website, this is not the case!

In Canada there are no laws regulating the handling, keeping or killing of cage-raised fur-bearing animals; and whilst the existing industry guidelines are entirely voluntary, there is no public inspection of fur farms, and therefore no way to determine if any of these voluntary guidelines are ever implemented. We will save energy and time visiting, however, and tell you that they aren’t. As for trapping, the most widely used trap in Canada is the leg-hold - the same trap to be banned in 88 countries worldwide explicitly for being “inhumane.”

To be humane is to show compassion, kindness or mercy. If by “compassion” you mean trapping a mother who chews off her own limb(s) in an attempt to return to her young; or by “kindness” you are referring to the confinement of animals to filthy and tiny cages for the entire duration of their seven month life; or by “mercy” you are suggesting anal or vaginal electrocution as a form of euthanasia, then YES the Canadian fur industry respects humane standards.

4. Are those videos being circulated on the internet real?

Which videos would those be? There are millions of videos on the internet… If you are referring to the ones exposing the hidden “horrors” of the fur industry, however, then… yes.

We were quoted recently as saying: “one of the most gruesome and offensive videos now circulating shows raccoons in a Chinese village being, literally, skinned while still alive. The question is why anyone would do something so cruel…” which is rather sly of us. It is always easier to accuse and condemn others for their wrongdoings, rather than admit to (and correct) our own, especially as we are also guilty of extreme cruelty towards animals. Whilst the fur-bearers aren’t always alive when we skin them we have systematically abused and neglected them during the months of their life prior to their untimely death.

Contrary to what we formally state in response to such videos, it is possible to produce extremely high-quality fur even if the animals aren’t raised in good living conditions. In fact, the fur is developed by the fur-bearer for survival, so without a balanced diet, clean pen and excellent care their pelt will become even thicker to insulate and protect them. As we stated in the section on “animal welfare” it is most likely because these animals are housed in deplorable conditions in extreme temperatures that fur from Canada is ranked number one.

Without any laws regulating the handling, keeping or killing of cage-raised fur-bearing animals in Canada, it doesn’t matter how many exposés there are as nothing will change!

5. Are coats sold in Canada made from cat and dog fur?

Whilst domestic cats and dogs do make up a portion of the 9 million trash animals caught in trap lines each year, these animals have not been targeted and therefore hold no economic value to us. As a result, they are simply discarded and never used in the production of fur garments in Canada. This does not mean, however, that no fur garments sold in Canada are made using cat or dog fur...

Despite being banned in Australia, the European Union and United States, it is legal in Canada to import cat and dog fur from Asia. Garments sold in high-end fashion houses will generally carry a label indicating the fur origin and species to help promote the myth that fur equates to luxury and wealth - the rarer the pelt the more expensive and “luxurious” it becomes. There are, however, NO legal requirements for manufacturers or retailers to label anything.It’s probably no surprise then that lower-end retailers have been known to label fur incorrectly. In some instances cat or dog fur has been labelled as rabbit or wolf; whilst faux fur has transpired to be real!

In some countries cats and dogs are consumed for human means, although for Europeans and North Americans this is unthinkable. Whereas we see all animals as commodities and don’t necessarily distinguish between cats or cows or coyotes, the general population in Canada is slightly more selective in which animals they will or won’t consume. The more apt question would therefore be: “how do you get away with selling cat or dog fur to conscientious consumers in Canada?” Some of our most common tactics for deceiving customers is to dye, trim or process the fur in such a way to resemble faux fur, or the fur of another species.

If there was anything to be learned from this, it would be: don’t trust us!

6. Who are the “animal activists” and what do they want?

There are two types of animal activists that we know of - animal welfare and animal rights – both of whom aim to provide “a voice for the voiceless” or something to that effect. In actual fact, these animals aren’t voiceless and certainly those that we’ve encountered can make themselves heard rather well – howling in pain when they are caught in traps; whining when confined in cages day after day; and screaming when hung prior to electrocution – but we simply don’t listen.

The animal welfare activists campaign for the better treatment of animals, primarily through legislation and regulation, as well as for “humane euthanasia”. We don’t consider them much of a threat, however, as even if their campaigns were successful we would still be able to kill animals for fur - it would simply become a more painful process for us, as opposed to for the animals. The animal rights activists, on the other hand, campaign for the abolition of the fur industry. As for what they want, well, we have heard some activists ask this question, to which others replied “animal liberation”, before asking when they wanted this, receiving the response “now”.

We have made sweeping sensational accusations in the past, calling these activists “extremists” and “terrorists”, but if truth be told those terms apply more to us than them! We are the ones who use extreme measures to catch and kill millions of animals; and we are the ones who fill them with terror, whether caught in a trap or caged on a farm. We have observed caged fur-bearers displaying extreme fear of us including defecating, trembling, screaming and withdrawing to the back of their cage, as well as attempting to bite the farm workers! We are thankful, however, that it is easier for the general public to see activists as the enemy, rather than us, predominantly because the activities that we engage in go unseen. Although with the recent rise in the number of exposés, this will become a lot harder.

One of the ways in which we hope to keep these activists at bay is to spend more of taxpayers’ dollars on further misleading marketing campaigns, such as “Fur is Green”.